Project 21’s Deneen Borelli Speaks Out on Wisconsin’s Budget Crisis, Protests
Feb 22, 2011 at 1:29 PM
David W. Almasi in Economics, Government, Government Spending, Labor, Labor Unions, Project 21, Protests, Race, Social Welfare, Spending, Taxes, White House

Three times this past weekend, Project 21 fellow Deneen Borelli appeared on the Fox News Channel to discuss and debate Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s attempt to solve his state’s budget deficit crisis through moderate reform of the collective bargaining process as it relates to some public employees.

 

On the 2/19/11 edition of “America’s News Headquarters,” Deneen pointed out to host Jamie Colby that Governor Walker is working with a mandate given to him by voters last November and is “taking a stand on principle” to eliminate his state’s budget deficit.  Deneen noted organized labor wants to “make an example” of Walker by defeating his proposal in Wisconsin so that it will not be considered in other states where similar budget crises loom.

 

Also on 2/19/11, on “Justice with Judge Jeanine Pirro,” Deneen said the protests in Madison against Governor Walker and his plan to reform collective bargaining in light of the budget crisis are “an assault on the taxpayers of Wisconsin.”  She noted that unions are scared of such reforms being employed elsewhere should Walker succeed.  Matt Batzel of American Majority and Mike Langyel of the Wisconsin Teachers Union joined Deneen and Judge Pirro in this discussion.

 

A few hours later, early on Sunday morning (2/20/11), Deneen debated liberal political strategist Christopher Hahn on the Wisconsin protests, with “Fox and Friends” host Clayton Moore serving as the moderator.  Deneen noted that Wisconsin “can’t cover these lavish benefits on the backs of the taxpayers,” and that Governor Walker is “showing leadership” since the budget mess is “not going to fix itself.”

Deneen further pointed out that the anti-Walker protestors differ from tea party activists because the majority of the protestors in Madison seem to have been organized (and many of them were even bused in) by unions and partisan groups such as Obama’s Organizing for America operation.  In contrast, the tea parties have a loose conglomeration are largely self-financed.

Article originally appeared on A Conservative Blog (http://www.conservativeblog.org/).
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