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Tuesday
Apr222014

Video: Supreme Court Upholds Michigan's Ban on Race Preferences; Video Explains the Issues Before the Court

The U.S. Supreme Court today, in the case of Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, upheld the state of Michigan's decision, made by referendum in 2006, prohibiting preferential treatment in public employment, education and contracting based on "race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin."

Last October 16, the day after the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case decided today, the Project 21 black leadership network held a policy luncheon featuring Jennifer Gratz, the executive director of the Michigan Civil Rights Initiative. Gratz was the plaintiff in the 2003 case of Gratz v. Bollinger that found the University of Michigan's race conscious admissions policy violated the Constitution's Equal Protection Clause.

This is an excellent video to view for a quick education on the issues and events surrounding the case decided today.

Project 21 also issued a press release on the Schuette decision this morning after it was handed down, featuring the comments of Project 21's two co-chairmen, Cherylyn Harley LeBon and Horace Cooper. LeBon and Cooper also moderated the discussion in the video:

Supreme Court on Path to Ending Race Preferences

Ruling in Schuette Case Paves Way for More Equal, Less Divided America

Black Activists in Favor of Ending Quotas Available for Comment

For Release: April 22, 2014

Contact: David Almasi at (202) 543-4110 x11 or (703) 568-4727 (text-enabled) or dalmasi@nationalcenter.org or Judy Kent at (703) 759-7476 or jkent@nationalcenter.org

WASHINGTON, DC - Attorneys and activists with the Project 21 black leadership network are pleased about today's U.S. Supreme Court decision on race preferences, and hope the Court's latest ruling on race-conscious school admissions policies will become decisive in finally ending government-enforced rules creating arbitrary demographic quotas.

"Today, the Supreme Court moved us closer to the colorblind principle that Martin Luther King advocated and that is embedded in the 14th Amendment," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Horace Cooper, a former constitutional law professor. "I'm pleased that the principle of treating all Americans the same under the law can go forward in Michigan."

ALT TAGThe Court ruled 6-2, with Justice Kagan not voting.

In the case of Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action, which was argued before the U.S. Supreme Court last October, the justices considered whether the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals correctly voided an amendment to the Michigan state constitution, passed by voters in 2006, prohibiting preferential treatment in public employment, education and contracting based on "race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin." The Michigan Civil Rights Initiative, which became Section 26 of the state's constitution after its enactment, was supported by 58 percent of Michigan voters. It was struck down, however, by the 6th Circuit in 2012.

Project 21 submitted an amicus brief to the Supreme Court in the Schuette case written and joined by the Pacific Legal Foundation, noting that "[t]he clear effect of Section 26 is to prohibit the State and its political subdivisions from adopting race- and sex-based preference programs." The brief also presented factual data about how the prohibition of race-based preferences in California increased diversity and minority retention rates. Similar to Michigan, California voters outlawed race preferences in public college and university admissions in 1996.

Project 21 held a meeting of experts to discuss the case featuring Jennifer Gratz, the executive director of the Michigan Civil Rights Initiative after the Court's oral arguments. Gratz was the plaintiff in the 2003 case of Gratz v. Bollinger that found the University of Michigan's race conscious admissions policy violated the Constitution's Equal Protection Clause. Her talk and the discussion following can be viewed online here.

"It remains to be seen as to whether this is the definitive ruling which will eliminate racial preference policies," said Project 21 Co-Chairman Cherylyn Harley LeBon, a former senior counsel for the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee. "But I am encouraged that we are moving towards creating an equal playing field where the government does not choose the winners and inadvertent losers."

The rest of the press release is available here.

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